Americans Face Fewer Obamacare Choices, Higher Premiums in 2017

As open season begins Tuesday for enrollment in Obamacare next year, most customers for health insurance in the individual market will face both fewer choices and higher premiums under President Obama’s signature health care law.

More than three-fifths of the states, 33 of them, will have fewer insurers offering coverage on the Obamacare exchanges than they did in 2016.

Arizona and Texas are each losing six insurers, while two other states—Kentucky and Ohio—are losing four each. Only one state, Virginia, will have more exchange insurers next year than this year.

Five states—Alabama, Alaska, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Wyoming—will have only one insurer offering exchange coverage in 2017, while another 13 states will have only two.

Because many of the remaining insurers offer coverage only in part of a state, the reduction in choice is even more pronounced at the county level. One-third of all U.S. counties (32.8 percent) will have only one insurer offering exchange coverage in 2017, and another one-third (35.9 percent) will have only two competing insurers.

So exchange customers in two-thirds (68.7 percent) of U.S. counties will be faced with either a monopoly or a duopoly in health insurance.

At the same time, insurers also have increased premiums significantly. The Department of Health and Human Services, which oversees Obamacare, had to admit that premiums are increasing by an average of 25 percent in the 39 states using the federally run insurance exchange.

Indeed, residents of 10 states using the federal exchange face average premium increases of 40 percent or more: Alabama (58 percent), Arizona (116 percent), Illinois (43 percent), Kansas (42 percent), Montana (44 percent), North Carolina (40 percent), Nebraska (51 percent), Oklahoma (69 percent), Pennsylvania (53 percent), and Tennessee (63 percent). In at least one state running its own exchange (Minnesota) premiums are increasing by a similar rate (56 percent).

The Obama administration has tried to spin this news by repeatedly stating that 85 percent of customers on one of the state insurance exchanges receive taxpayer-funded subsidies for their coverage, which will soften the blow to their wallets.

While that is technically true, it offers an incomplete and misleading picture.

The most recent comprehensive enrollment data show that 17.7 million Americans had health coverage from the individual market as of the end of 2015. Of that number, 7.4 million (42 percent) had coverage subsidized by taxpayers, while the remaining 10.3 million (58 percent) paid the full cost on their own.

Because the Affordable Care Act bars insurers from charging off-exchange customers a different premium than on-exchange customers for the same plan, nearly 60 percent of those with individual market coverage will face the full cost of any premium increases.

Want to understand why Obamacare remains persistently unpopular?

Consider the likely reactions of those 10 million Americans as they open letters from their insurers informing them of their premium increases — or, worse, that their health care coverage is being discontinued.

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Study Finds Significant Differences in Plans Sold on or off Obamacare Exchanges

Three years after opening their online doors, the health insurance marketplaces remain under intense scrutiny, but individual health plans that are not sold through these exchanges have largely escaped attention. New research sheds some light on what these plans are like and how they fit into the overall individual market.

The analysis by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that the mix of 2016 plans sold outside the exchange by brokers or insurers is very different from those sold on the marketplace. On the marketplace, silver plans, which pay for 70 percent of covered expenses on average, are by far the most popular, comprising about two-thirds of all plans. Bronze plans make up 16 percent and gold and platinum plans 12 percent of marketplace offerings.

Off the marketplace, only about a third of plans available are silver. Another third of plans are bronze offerings that pay for 60 percent of expenses on average, while 25 percent are gold plans that pay for 80 percent of expenses or platinum plans that cover 90 percent.

In addition, more than half of plans sold off the exchange offered some sort of out-of-network coverage, compared with 36 percent of plans sold on the exchange.

Premiums and deductibles were higher in off-exchange plans, the analysis found. The average monthly silver premium was $314 compared with $279 for marketplace plans, while off-exchange silver plan deductibles were more than $1,200 higher on average, $3,273 versus $2,053.

“Off-exchange plans may offer out-of-network benefits and other features that are more useful to people,” said Katherine Hempstead, who directs the health insurance research work for the foundation.

People who are interested in off-exchange plans might have family members who are being treated for a medical condition and want access to a broader provider network or to out-of-network providers, for example, she said.

Though provider networks may be more extensive off the exchange and coverage details may vary, plans sold on and off the exchange must be similar in many ways. The health law created standards that all individual plans must meet, no matter where they’re sold. They must all cover essential health benefits, including hospitalization, prescription drugs and doctor visits, for example. They also all have to fit into the four metal coverage tiers that reflect the varying percentages of overall health care expenses they cover.

The obvious advantage to buying a plan on the marketplace is that people can receive premium tax credits that make coverage more affordable only if they buy a plan there. About 85 percent of marketplace customers qualify for the subsidies that are available to people with incomes up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level (about $47,000 for one person). The federal government recently reported that an estimated 2.5 million people may eligible for subsidized coverage but are paying full price for coverage off the exchange.

But for people whose income is too high to qualify for subsidies, there’s less reason to limit their shopping to the marketplace.

Off-exchange plans make up about a quarter of all individual market offerings, the analysis found. But while it’s easy to compare marketplace plans, there’s no easy way to do that with plans sold off the marketplace, Hempstead said.

“Right now the off-exchange market is kind of the Wild West in terms of how consumers know what’s available,” she said.

This article was originally published by Kaiser Health News. Kaiser Health News is an editorially independent program of the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonprofit, nonpartisan health policy research and communication organization not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

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He Predicted Obamacare Wouldn’t Be ‘Affordable.’ Democrats Didn’t Listen.

Robert Laszewski is a policy adviser and analyst for the health insurance industry. He’s correctly predicted Obamacare’s pitfalls since day one.

In an interview with “Full Measure” this Sunday, Laszewski says he warned the Obama administration and other Democrats not to call it the “Affordable Care Act.” Earlier this week, the administration announced Obamacare premiums are spiking 25 percent.

Here’s a transcript from our interview:

Laszewski: The future is not good. The fundamental problem is not enough healthy people have signed up to pay for the sick, and not enough healthy people have signed up because the insurance plans that people are being offered just simply aren’t of good value.

Attkisson: What do customers see as wrong with the insurance product?

Laszewski: The insurance products consumers see are still too expensive in terms of premium. And the deductibles and copays are too high.

Attkisson: Can you explain in simple terms how the insurance companies are losing so much money if they’re charging so much for premiums and if deductibles are so high?

Laszewski: It’s real simple. If you only provide a health insurance plan that the sickest people buy, you can’t charge enough. You can never charge enough.

Attkisson: At it’s core, it was supposed the provide affordable insurance for everybody who needed it.

Laszewski: Yes. The Affordable Care Act was supposed to ensure that whether you were employed or unemployed or self-employed, you would have access to affordable health insurance. For someone who’s not getting a subsidy, who’s paying the full cost of the insurance, it’s likely they are now paying about double what they paid before under the old market, where only healthy people could get in.

>>> Find out when and where you can watch “Full Measure”

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In Desperate Push to Save Dying Obamacare, Obama Wants to Bail Out Insurers

The death knell for Obamacare has been rung. President Barack Obama’s own Department of Health and Human Services confirmed this week that Americans will experience double-digit premium hikes on their health care plans beginning Nov. 1. In fact, the average increase will be 25 percent.

And while costs are going up, choice is going down: 1 out of every 5 Americans will have only one health insurer to choose from. More costs, less choice — so much for the “affordable” part of the Affordable Care Act.

No doubt about it: Obamacare is dying. But don’t count on it going gently into that good night. Instead, count the billions of dollars Obamacare is trying to rob from the American taxpayer on its way to the grave.

As health policy expert Robert Moffit of The Heritage Foundation explained in a recent commentary, Obamacare is “like a patient suffering from multi-organ failure [and] … central planning is the disease.”

But instead of pulling the plug, Obama and the insurance companies want to put Obamacare on a costly life-support line of cash, all on the taxpayer’s dime.

One symptom of the central planning disease, and indicators of Obamacare’s death spiral, is that the insurance companies haven’t made money by offering qualified health plans on the Obamacare exchanges.

Instead, the insurance companies are losing money hand over fist, despite “risk mitigation” programs baked in by Obamacare architects to sweeten the deal for large insurance companies.

Now, the Obama administration is signaling it wants to find any way it can to funnel as much as $170 billion of taxpayer money to the insurance companies, in hopes of keeping the law alive.

In other words, the administration wants to bail out insurance companies in order to bail out Obamacare.

So what exactly are these risk mitigation provisions, and how might they result in a taxpayer-funded bailout? If you’re in a hurry, you can watch this 2-minute video from The Daily Signal’s Melissa Quinn.

Got some more time? Read this detailed memo from Heritage Action for America, titled  “How Congress Can Stop the Impending Obamacare Bailouts.”

But for situational awareness, the main three risk mitigation programs are called 1) cost-sharing subsidies, 2) the traditional reinsurance program, and 3) the risk corridors program.

Cost-sharing subsidies. They required insurers to artificially reduce deductibles and copays for low-income Obamacare enrollees. The administration was caught making illegal payments to the insurers to compensate for the discounts, essentially shelling out billions of dollars that weren’t authorized by Congress.

Thankfully for your wallet, a federal judge has put a pause on any more payments under this program.

The reinsurance program. It was a new tax on employer-provided health insurance, collected to create a pot of money to redistribute to insurance companies that lost profits from covering high-risk individuals. However, under this section of Obamacare, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) also was required to make $5 billion in deposits into the Treasury and back to the taxpayers.

Want to guess how much HHS officials have paid so far? Zero. Why? Because they have broken the law by prioritizing payments to the insurance companies.

Which is why Rep. Mark Walker, R-N.C., and Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., have introduced the Taxpayers Before Insurers Act to force HHS to pay the American people back the $5 billion owed.

Getting Congress to prioritize the taxpayer over the insurance companies hasn’t made the insurance companies happy — especially when they want Congress to continue their gravy train past 2016.

As Ed Haislmaier, another health policy expert at The Heritage Foundation, writes in his appropriately headlined piece, “Grand Theft Health Insurance”:

Recently, the national Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association has been aggressively lobbying Congress to ignore the Obama administration’s illegal diversion of tax dollars into the pockets of—you guessed it—health insurers….To be sure, it is the Obama administration, and not the insurers, who perpetrated this heist. But for the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association to now lobby Congress to keep getting the money puts them in the unseemly (to say the least) position of the guy caught with stolen merchandise demanding that he be allowed to keep his ill-gotten goods because he wasn’t the one who originally stole them.

The risk corridors program. It was supposed to create another temporary funding stream to transfer money from insurance companies that made profits to insurance companies that suffered losses from selling Obamacare plans.

The problem is that we’ve seen much higher losses than profits. So the insurance companies that feel stiffed have sued the Obama administration for the difference.

Sadly, the administration seems only too willing to find a way to get the insurers the money they want. Even if it means paying them through the legally questionable method of settling the lawsuits and making payments out of the “Judgment Fund” — something the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service says the administration doesn’t have the authority to do.

But when has lack of authority ever stopped Obama before? Especially when it comes to the law that bears his name.

That’s the bad news. The bailouts are coming and Congress must act to stop them. The good news is that, unsurprisingly, the American people really don’t like the government’s giving their money to insurance companies in an effort to prop up Obamacare.

According to market research conducted by American Perception Initiative (API), which is affiliated with The Heritage Foundation, the vast majority of Americans strongly opposes using taxpayer dollars to bail out Obamacare.

Fully 87 percent of those surveyed agreed when asked whether they agreed or disagreed with this statement: “If private insurance companies lose money selling health insurance under the Obamacare program, taxpayers should not have to bail them out to cover their losses.”

I repeat: 87 percent. That’s what’s known as a mandate. Which means members of Congress and their staff can have complete confidence that Americans support action to stop the impending bailouts.

Or, put another way, if congressional Republican leadership is looking for a unifying issue after the election, it isn’t going to be passing a new internet sales tax or a massive omnibus spending package (like last year). Stopping illegal payments to insurance companies would be a unifying issue.

What’s more, the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office and Congressional Research Service also have thrown flags on the Obama administration’s play of paying insurers at the expense of taxpayers. Both found that the payments under the reinsurance program are illegal – just like they found using the Judgment Fund to make risk corridor payments would be illegal.

So when it comes to the legality of bailing out Obamacare, the Obama administration is 0- 3 against a federal judge and two of the government’s own watchdog agencies.

For Congress, the choice couldn’t be clearer: Protect Obamacare or protect the American people.

The only question left to answer is who Congress will side with. The rule of law and its constituents? Or the insurance companies and the president?

As brutal Obamacare premium hikes hit families again in less than a week, and we head into the dangerous waters of a lame-duck session of Congress after the election, it’s as good of time as any to remind Congress that the American people don’t plan on going gently into the night either.

Especially not while their tax dollars are at risk of being used to bail out Obamacare.

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In 6 Charts, the Rising Costs of Obamacare Rates

New data from the federal government show that monthly premiums for health insurance plans sold on the federal exchange, HealthCare.gov, will increase by an average of 25 percent in 2017.

The Department of Health and Human Services released a report Monday analyzing the state and federal health insurance exchanges ahead of the fourth open enrollment period, which begins Nov. 1.

Rate changes for the second-lowest cost “silver plan” range from a 145 percent increase for a 27-year-old living in Maricopa County, Arizona, to a 12 percent drop for a 27-year-old living in Marion County, Indiana.

In a statement, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell downplayed the rising premium costs, noting that most consumers who purchase coverage on HealthCare.gov and the state exchanges receive a subsidy.

“Thanks to financial assistance, most marketplace consumers this year will find plan options with premiums between $50 and $100 per month,” Burwell said.

In addition to double-digit rate increases, consumers will see a decrease in the number of insurers selling plans on the exchanges.

The Department of Health and Human Services received data on health insurance plans and premiums from most states ahead of the open enrollment period.

Six of the 12 states that operate their own exchanges did not provide information to the Obama administration; they are Colorado, Idaho, Maryland, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

Check out the status of Obamacare’s exchanges for 2017 in these six charts.

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White House Says Obamacare Premiums Will Rise By Double-Digits Next Year

The Obama administration said insurance premiums will rise by double-digit percentages in 2017, a statement that will likely bring the debate surrounding Obamacare to the forefront in the final days of the 2016 election.

Premiums will increase at an average of 25 percent across the 39 states serviced by the online marketplace healthcare.gov, according to the Obama administration. Even worse, around 20 percent of consumers, or 1 in 5, will only have one insurer to choose from in the marketplace.

This year’s expected increase is triple the size of 2016, and will have a direct effect on 16 percent of consumers who are not protected by subsidies, the Hill reports. Some 5 to 7 million consumers are either not eligible for subsidy assistance, or they purchase healthcare packages outside of the exchanges, where subsidies are not available.

The remainder of consumers will likely be protected from price increases by Obamacare subsidies.

Officials from the administration note that these increases are not a true reflection of what consumers will end up paying, and furthermore say consumers who are willing to go for a lesser plan will still be able to find a bargain on the exchanges.

The administration made its statement on the same day  the Kaiser Family Foundation (KKF) released its findings on the 2017 premium increases. KKF found that premium increases will rise in 2017 more than any other year of Obamacare. The increases are due to a combination of factors, including: “substantial losses experienced by many insurers in this market and the phasing out of the ACA’s reinsurance program.”

For a 40-year-old, non-smoking individual, the report finds that premiums ranged from “$186 per month in Albuquerque, NM to $719 in Anchorage, Alaska, before accounting for the tax credit that most enrollees in this market receive.” That same person could see their plan rise 145 percent in Phoenix, Az., and 71 percent in Birmingham, Al. and Oklahoma City, Ok.

This is not great news for the already struggling healthcare legislation. Obamacare is in the midst of a death spiral: 17 co-ops have failed, the Tennessee Health Commissioner says the healthcare exchanges in the state are “very near collapse,” insurance companies in North Carolina have become a “financial sinkhole,” and few health experts have positive things to say about the future of the legislation.

The total number of insurers participating on the Obamacare exchanges is likely to drop from 232 this year to 167 in 2017. That is a loss of 28 percent in just 12 months.

Originally published by The Daily Caller News Foundation

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As Obama Travels to Florida to Promote Obamcare, State Faces Higher Costs, Fewer Options

Before Obamacare insurance exchanges were established in 2013, Florida had 18 insurers operating in the state. President Barack Obama arrives in Miami Thursday to promote his signature legislative achievement, as Florida now has just five companies for Florida residents to choose from.

The Affordable Care Act was sold in part as a means to lower prices and increase competition, but in numerous states, including Florida, the law has done neither.

Obama will deliver remarks about Obamacare at Miami Dade College in Miami regarding “the progress made in ensuring that all Americans have access to quality, affordable health care.”

In 2016, the Sunshine State had seven insurers a plunge from 18 pre-Obamacare, according to data compiled by The Heritage Foundation.

”Promise after promise of the [Obamacare] program turned out to be not true,” @LaurenSchenone says.

However, UnitedHealth and Aetna announced they would be exiting Florida’s health care exchanges in 2017, leaving Floridians with just five insurers.

Also Florida was one of 41 states to see an increase in Obamacare deductibles in 2016. On average, Florida deductibles increased $990, or about a 23 percent increase from the previous year, according to Freedom Partners, a conservative advocacy group.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott’s office contends the law is not helping the state.

“The governor has continued to say that Obamacare is not the answer to improving our healthcare system when promise after promise of the program turned out to be not true,” Scott’s press secretary Lauren Schenone told The Daily Signal. “Gov. Scott is proud we have made historic Medicaid reforms in Florida that have made our system more accessible and affordable to low income people who need access to high quality medical care.”

Most of Florida’s health insurers proposed rate increases averaging 13 percent for 2017, the Associated Press reported earlier this year. That included Florida Blue, the state’s largest insurer, which, proposed a 14 percent rate hike.

Scott, a Republican, is taking action at the state level to try to keep medical costs down, Schenone said.

“Gov. Scott has fought to increase transparency and end unfair, high costs for patients at Florida hospitals,” Schenone continued. “Just this year, he signed legislation to protect patients from paying unexpected bills for out-of-network services.”

Obama’s planned Florida speech comes just one day after the Department of Health and Human Services released a report projecting 13.8 million people will sign up for coverage on the marketplace during the upcoming open enrollment for 2017. That would be a 1.1 million increase from the previous year, roughly the same growth as 2016.

“We’re confident that millions of Americans will choose to enroll when they learn that quality, affordable health insurance is within reach,” Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell said in remarks Wednesday.
Though, the secretary admitted some improvements would be needed.

“We’ve put our ideas on the table to build on the historic progress achieved under the ACA and continue to improve America’s health care system,” Burwell said. “We need partners. And we are hopeful that soon, we’ll see bipartisan collaboration in Congress and the states that will help us make improvements to the law.”

Companies are exiting Obamacare because of the cost of insuring the sick and lower income without enough young and healthy people, said Ed Haislmaier, a senior research fellow for health policy studies at The Heritage Foundation.

“Florida seems to skew somewhat heavier to lower income enrollees, more than most states based on the share of people getting subsidies is higher than more other states,” Haislmaier told The Daily Signal.

Based on 2015 numbers, the most recent available, 92 percent of Obamacare enrollees in Florida are getting tax subsidies, while the national average is 84 percent of enrollees.

“We don’t know how many had insurance before. The question is, will the plan insure anyone else going forward,” Haislmaier said. “The [Affordable Care Act] relies on healthier people signing up. A lot of the people they want to reach wouldn’t get subsidies, and it makes it difficult to expand beyond the program already in place.”

The costs will likely continue to rise, but at this point, it’s something the 115th Congress will have to deal with, Haislmaier said.

“It matters more to the next Congress. I don’t see either of the presidential candidates taking the lead,” Haislmaier said. “Basically, it’s not quite at the crisis stage yet, but as the individual exchanges hit higher premiums, Congress responds to a crisis. Something will come out of Congress and it will be bipartisan, that’s the only way it will pass and the next administration will support it.”

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Obamacare Is Experiencing Multi-Organ Failure

President Barack Obama’s speech Thursday will likely highlight the “successes” of Obamacare, but this complex health law—with interlocking parts—is really becoming more like a patient suffering from multi-organ failure.

This year’s feverish health insurance premiums are unlikely to abate. For 2017, the premiums on Obamacare’s individual market are projected to increase by 25 percent on average.

Central planning is the disease.

It starts with the costly health insurance benefit mandates that the law requires of plans sold on the Obamacare exchanges. Those can only be sustained through a heavy dose of taxpayer subsidies for enrollees. For lower-income customers, the federal subsidies only mask the symptoms of the dramatic cost increases.

Meanwhile, the federal subsidy system is so poorly designed that in 2015 half of the lower-income people receiving subsidies ended up owing the government money. At the same time, health insurance deductibles skyrocketed. Still, there is a mandate to buy the federally approved insurance.

Yet, the individual mandate tax penalty—riddled with exceptions—is less than the cost of the insurance itself, rendering it ineffective; and an ugly business to enforce. From the inception of the enrollment in 2014, it was estimated that about 90 percent of those remaining uninsured would not be forced to pay a penalty. The result is that the Obamacare exchanges have disproportionately enrolled those who are older, sicker, and poorer.

The Obamacare exchanges are not quite in cardiac arrest, but the vital signs show it heading there: less choice, less competition, higher premiums, and more substantial deductibles.

Why? Because millions of younger, healthier people don’t see a benefit in enrolling. This “adverse selection” ends in even higher costs for insurers. Unable to sustain the losses, more insurers withdraw, further reducing exchange competition and enrollee choice.

Beyond big deductibles to make their higher premiums more “affordable,” insurers have narrowed the networks of doctors and hospitals covered by their plans, making enrollees’ access to care progressively more difficult and resulting in consumers having fewer doctors and hospitals to choose from. A new McKinsey & Co. analysis of insurance plan filings for 18 states shows that 75 percent of the offering on the 2017 exchanges will be HMOs with narrow networks.

And, faced with bigger losses on the increasingly dysfunctional exchanges, insurers beg Congress for bailouts—all funded on the backs of federal taxpayers.

The administration is hoping that exchange enrollment will increase. The Obamacare exchanges are not quite in cardiac arrest, but the vital signs show it heading there: less choice, less competition, higher premiums, and more substantial deductibles.

Independent analysts, such as Standard & Poor’s, are projecting a modest growth (possibly even a decline) in enrollment. The administration officials and their allies are pondering the same old quack remedies—a big IV drip of  taxpayer subsidies and even more coercive regulation.

As we head into Obamacare’s open enrollment season for 2017, Congress needs a health policy cure, not more short-term bailouts to insurers. Congress must systematically repeal and replace the law’s damaging provisions with competently crafted statutory alternatives. Bailouts just perpetuate the suffering.

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See How Much Premiums Will Increase Under Obamacare in These 14 States

Consumers will be hit by increases in health insurance premiums of 10 percent or more in all but one of 14 states and the District of Columbia where regulators have approved higher rates.

In Vermont, insurance rates will rise by an average of 5.5 percent.

Insurance companies submitted their rate proposals for 2017 over the past few months. In the lead-up to Obamacare’s open enrollment period beginning Nov. 1, regulators have begun to approve or alter the requests.

Consumers purchasing health coverage both on and off of the Obamacare exchanges will see their rates increase by an average of at least 10 percent, according to the insurer filings.

The Obama administration has stressed that many consumers, especially those who qualify for government subsidies to pay premiums, won’t feel the full effects of the higher payments.

More than 9 million Americans received subsidies to help pay premiums, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell said earlier this month.

However, another 2.5 million who purchased plans off the Obamacare exchanges in the individual market may qualify for financial assistance if they instead buy plans on the exchanges. Those who receive subsidies could end up paying monthly premiums of less than $75, Burwell said.

But Burwell didn’t address the nearly 10 million Americans who purchase plans sold in the individual market and don’t qualify for a subsidy.

Rising premiums, experts warn, will directly affect those consumers.

In their filings with states, insurance companies point to the end of Obamacare’s reinsurance program as one reason they need to increase rates. The reinsurance program, which expires at the end of the year, was designed to mitigate risk among insurers.

Insurers also point to their customers’ high medical costs as contributing to rising premiums.

Here’s how rates in these 14 states—Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, and Vermont—and the District of Columbia will increase next year:

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See How Much Premiums Will Increase Under Obamacare in These 14 States

Consumers will be hit by increases in health insurance premiums of 10 percent or more in all but one of 14 states and the District of Columbia where regulators have approved higher rates.

In Vermont, insurance rates will rise by an average of 5.5 percent.

Insurance companies submitted their rate proposals for 2017 over the past few months. In the lead-up to Obamacare’s open enrollment period beginning Nov. 1, regulators have begun to approve or alter the requests.

Consumers purchasing health coverage both on and off of the Obamacare exchanges will see their rates increase by an average of at least 10 percent, according to the insurer filings.

The Obama administration has stressed that many consumers, especially those who qualify for government subsidies to pay premiums, won’t feel the full effects of the higher payments.

More than 9 million Americans received subsidies to help pay premiums, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell said earlier this month.

However, another 2.5 million who purchased plans off the Obamacare exchanges in the individual market may qualify for financial assistance if they instead buy plans on the exchanges. Those who receive subsidies could end up paying monthly premiums of less than $75, Burwell said.

But Burwell didn’t address the nearly 10 million Americans who purchase plans sold in the individual market and don’t qualify for a subsidy.

Rising premiums, experts warn, will directly affect those consumers.

In their filings with states, insurance companies point to the end of Obamacare’s reinsurance program as one reason they need to increase rates. The reinsurance program, which expires at the end of the year, was designed to mitigate risk among insurers.

Insurers also point to their customers’ high medical costs as contributing to rising premiums.

Here’s how rates in these 14 states—Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, Oregon, Tennessee, and Vermont—and the District of Columbia will increase next year:

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